Motivate Your Students with Social-Emotional Learning


Neuroscience of Education:

The Positive Student Impact of Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) and Neuronscience-Based Approaches 

Educators have a powerful effect on the social-emotional learning development of children. New research points to SEL approaches that maximize educators’ positive impact on students affected by Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Build a positive impact on Students
This presentation will review the new research on the effects of ACEs and environmental stress on brain maturation and learning, then turn attention to the research on Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs) associated with positive educational outcomes.
The webinar will conclude with suggestions for the use of individualized instruction combined with technology to build academic skills as well as the confidence to achieve in all students.

Get a copy (pdf) of the slides 

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INDEX

Time  Topic

04:55 Turning ACEs to PACEs
12.30 Tracts mature at different rates (Stimulation drives Maturity)
13:07 Six Factors that may lead to Troubled Teens
14:05 Brain Structure and Poverty
14:55 A Major effect of Brain Maturation is STRESS
17:05 Know the Three kinds of Stress
30:40 Social Emotional Learning (SEL) – Education Perspective
33.10 Poor Working memory doesn’t just affect RETENTION
33:14 How Fast ForWord builds Phonological Working Memory
35:45 Neuroscience – Moving from WHY TO WHAT and HOW
37:30 How to turn around troubled Teens

NOTE – Slides
The slides in this webinar are available as a handout. We will send them to you when you complete the form on the video above about Social Emotional Learning .

Educators have a powerful effect on the social-emotional development of children. New research points to SEL approaches that maximize educators’ positive impact on students affected by Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).

Social Emotional Learning Key Factor

Educators play a vital role in changing and building the Brain.

  • The human brain is an experience – dependent organ
  • It is the main goal of Teachers to build and change students brain
  • Educators create positive childhood experience
  • Children can achieve even those who begin at a disadvantaged level. With the use of individualized instruction combined with technology to build academic skills as well as the confidence to achieve in all students.

    Social Emotional Learning

Decoding Dyslexia for Educators

A Guide to Helping Students

1.  Learn the Dos and Don’ts

Know the Dyslexia Do’s and Don’ts to make your school an optimal learning environment for students showing signs of dyslexia.

2.  Five Ways Technology can help
  • Speech-to-text software For writing assignments, students can use a voice recognition tool that converts spoken words into typed sentences on the screen
  • Text-to-speech software Reading everything from books to worksheets can be made easier by being converted to audio files.
  • Smart pens LiveScribe™ SmartPen digitizes the notes that a student writes in a notebook while also recording the lecture.
  • Computer games that target phonological processing Because dyslexia is primarily an auditory disorder, students should use a program that strengthens phonological processing.
  • Spell checker Spelling check apps that are especially helpful for students with dyslexia include American WordSpeller™ and Typ-O HD.
3.  Checklist of Dyslexia Signs

Do you think one or more of your students might have some form of dyslexia? It can be difficult to spot because it’s a spectrum disorder and looks a little different on everyone. To help you decide who to recommend for a dyslexia screening and evaluation by a qualified professional, here is a checklist of dyslexia symptoms to look for by age.

Download the PDF Article

Transcription – Read Their Minds: An Update on Dyslexia Research and Brain Based Remediation.

 

Index
01:00 The Reading Brain
08:06 The role of executive function in reading
11:20 Updated view on the Simple View of Reading (SVR)
12:40 Reading impairments versus dyslexia – what is the difference?
14:20 Dyslexia – a historical perspective
18:10 Dyslexia – the education definition
19:45 Dyslexia a multi deficit approach
30:38 Perceptual and cognitive level differences
33:12 Phonological & orthographic deficit theories
38:00 Importance of early intervention
40:20 Individual differences – Each child is unique
43:50 The role of Neuroscience Technology

Many scientists think that the cause of dyslexia is a dysfunctional processing of auditory speech. However, even today, the reasons for these alterations in speech processing remain unknown. Children with dyslexia have considerable problems at school and are under great emotional pressure both at school and in the family. Adults with dyslexia frequently feel ashamed of their weakness and try to hide it from their social and professional environment.

  • First, dyslexia is neurological—it is a condition that stems from underlying differences in the brain, which is not the child’s fault. That means that the most effective dyslexia interventions will strengthen these specific underdeveloped areas of the brain.
  • Second, dyslexia is a problem of auditory processing. Successful interventions will train the brain to improve auditory processing speed that will in turn improve reading skills.

TRANSCRIPTION

Read and watch the full webinar on Read their minds: An Update on Dyslexia Research and Brain Based Remediation. 

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See the video of the webinar Click Here

Top 35 Questions on Dyslexia

Read Their Minds: An Update on Dyslexia Research and Brain Based Remediation. 

Some very interesting questions were asked during the webinar including; the impact on adults, identical twins, ADHD, early interventions, English language learners and more.

Key points:

  • Problems with Reading
  • Crossover Learning Issues
  • Intervention & Assessments
  • Other

Below are some few questions raised:

  • What are the most important pre-reading skills that children need to have in order to have a solid foundation for reading development?

Children need age level oral language skills, the ability to rhyme, name and recognize letters, and listen to books that are read orally to them.

  • Why do some students miss some words while reading?

There can be several reasons. Sometimes students skip over words because their visual tracking isn’t smooth and coordinated. Sometimes they just don’t recognize the word and trying to figure it out seems too difficult, so they skip over it or misread it. Sometimes, if in a hurry, they just misread it because they don’t take the time to figure it out.

  • How can we use these strategies with teens or adults? Can we adopt these Fast ForWord strategies to other real world examples?

Teens and adults have used Fast ForWord very successfully. There is also a program specifically designed for adults.

  • My son is having trouble with speech.  I am confident it is dyslexia but not sure how to help him before it gets to reading issues. He is 4 and a half

The student can do Reading Readiness on Fast ForWord. Speech problems will not be an issue and it might help sort out speech versus reading issues.

  • I would like to know if a student can be ADHD can be diagnosed with dyslexia since some characteristics are similar.

Yes, There is nothing about the brain that says a child cannot have two challenges at the same time. But, as you say, some of the problems seens in dyslexia (like problems with impulse control) are also seen in ADHD. I have seen children misdiagnosed as ADHD because reading is so difficult and they have trouble attending in school, but in other settings, they shine. That is why I recommend including a program like Fast ForWord in an intervention so that any attention problems can be addressed. If the child still has problems with self control after Fast ForWord a psychologist may diagnose ADHD.

  • Could delayed speech in children be related dyslexia?

Yes, it often is. Many children with delayed speech have difficulties learning to perceive speech sounds.

  • Where can I test Fast ForWord for my students?

Please contact admin@neuronlearning.com and we will send you demos and information based on your requirements.

To see all the questions 

Click Here

 

Free Webinar – Leadership and Classroom Secrets to Help Struggling Students Achieve

dyslexia webinar neuron learning

Introduction:

The achievement gap between rich students and poor students continues to be a major problem in our schools. Join us for a free webinar with education expert Dr. Eric Jensen.

You’ll learn:-
  • How learning environments and different teaching strategies impact brain development
  • What school leaders and educators can do to help students of poverty catch up to their peers once and for all.

So we know that young readers who are struggling and adult impaired readers show:

  • Normal brain structure in many ways
  • But 3 of the regions important for reading may not mature as
    quickly in struggling readers
  • And thus, the highways that connect the three key brain areas for
    reading do not become well myelinated.

The good news is that brain maps and the highways that connect them are “experience dependent” – neuroscience-based interventions can drive that development. 

Five ways that changes the lives of a struggling Student:

① Relationships
② Understand the REAL Problem
③ Shift Mindsets/Expectations
④ Build Cognitive Capacity Relentlessly
⑤ Teach Habits for Implementation

About the Speaker 

Dr. Jensen is a leader in brain-based learning and author of several best-selling books, including Poor Students, Rich Teaching.

Overview

Title: Leadership and Classroom Secrets to Help Struggling Students Achieve

Originally broadcast Date: Tuesday, September, 10th, 2019

Duration: 55 minutes

Free Webinar – Head First into Reading: Fast and Lasting Brain Based Solutions

dyslexia webinar neuron learning

Introduction:

Neuroscience has ushered in a new frontier for building reading skills in all students who struggle to achieve.

You’ll learn:-
  • The latest research on the reading brain and what is happening when students do not benefit from standard instruction.
  • How brain-based reading technologies speed reading mastery for lasting success.
  • By intertwining attention and memory skill building into explicit decoding, comprehension, and fluency exercises, students make 1-2 year gains after only 40 to 60 hours use of the Fast ForWord brain-based technology.

So we know that young readers who are struggling and adult impaired readers show:

  • Normal brain structure in many ways
  • But 3 of the regions important for reading may not mature as
    quickly in struggling readers
  • And thus, the highways that connect the three key brain areas for
    reading do not become well myelinated

The good news is that brain maps and the highways that connect them are “experience dependent” – neuroscience-based interventions can drive that development.

THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY

Well-designed neuroscience technologies can address foundational cognitive skills essential to academic success and
promote life skills (executive functions)
Fast ForWord uses a new 3-step process for fast reading results:

1. PREPARE the foundation for reading

• Targets missing skills and addresses weaknesses that other programs and methods don’t (memory, attention, processing speed, listening accuracy, etc.)


2. PRACTICE language and reading skills

• Your child receives 1000s of personalized practice opportunities – this is more intensive than any other approach and how to get far better results
• Adjusts to every click of the mouse or touch on an iPad
• Keeps your child at 80% success, 20% challenge


3. REINFORCE new reading skills

• As your child reads aloud, the Reading Assistant program listens and provides corrective reading feedback. This real-world reading reinforces newly learned skills and rapidly builds fluency and comprehension.

About the Speaker 

Dr. Martha Burns is an expert on how children learn and has written 3 books and over 100 articles. She is an associate professor in the Northwest University, USA

Overview

Title: Head First into Reading: Fast and Lasting Brain Based Solutions

Originally broadcast Date: Tuesday, August, 20th, 2019

Duration: 60 minutes

Webinar – Adding Neuroscience to Education – Can it Really Help?

dyslexia webinar neuron learning

Introduction:

You are ready to teach your students. But how can you help your students become better learners? Whether the subject is maths, science, history or English langauge skills all students need to be effective learners.
 
Now you can help your students absorb your teaching more effectively

Including neuroscience in education has been a popular topic in recent years but some people still have questions and would like to learn more about its usefulness and how it works.

You’ll learn:-

  • The 4 cognitive skills all learners need to have to learn effectively and optimally.
  • The FAST formula to make sure you hit the right levels of participation, to personalise the learning experience and build in motivation and blending of skills.
  • What technology can do to help you supplement your classroom instruction
  • The latest research into neuroscience and learning
  • And lots more in this new webinar.

What science says about why certain children struggle with language and reading, and others don’t — there are hidden factors at play.

THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY

Well-designed neuroscience technologies can address foundational cognitive skills essential to academic success and
promote life skills (executive functions)

NO MORE BAND-AIDS ON READING PROBLEMS

Fast ForWord uses a new 3-step process for fast reading results:


1. PREPARE the foundation for reading

• Targets missing skills and addresses weaknesses that other programs and methods don’t
(memory, attention, processing speed, listening accuracy, etc.)


2. PRACTICE language and reading skills

• Your child receives 1000s of personalized practice opportunities – this is more intensive
than any other approach and how to get far better results
• Adjusts to every click of the mouse or touch on an iPad
• Keeps your child at 80% success, 20% challenge


3. REINFORCE new reading skills

• As your child reads aloud, the Reading Assistant program listens and provides corrective
reading feedback. This real-world reading reinforces newly learned skills and rapidly builds
fluency and comprehension.

About the Speaker 

Mrs. Armes holds a Bachelor’s degree in both general and special education and a Master’s degree in Special Education with certification in the areas of Educational Diagnostician and Mid-Management.

Overview

Title: Adding Neuroscience to Education – Can it Really Help?

Originally broadcast Date: Thursday, May 30th, 2018

Duration: 40 minutes

2018 Dyslexia – A Multi-Deficit Approach

Wistia video thumbnail

Click here to view the full Webinar

A Multi-Deficit approach to Dyslexia is now considered the most accurate way to understand causation.

So, the view now of Dyslexia

isn’t that it’s caused by one thing, it’s not caused by reversing letters, Visually. It isn’t caused by just one thing, but it actually has several different factors that can contribute to it.

  • One is Genetics, we will talk about that. But we know that children who come from families where there is a brother or a sister or a mother or a father or even an aunt or uncle that had reading problems are much more genetically inclined toward having reading problems themselves and some genes have been identified.
  • Secondly, we know there are Brain Level Differences. We know that children with dyslexia process information differently in the brain. When we look at brain function on functional imaging process information differently than children who don’t have reading issues. We will talk about that.
  • There are these Perceptual Cognitive Level issues and those are speech sounds perception also includes visual perception also includes memory skills, working memory, auditory phonological memory skills and skills like processing speed and we will talk about that, those cognitive level differences.
  • Then there are Environmental Factors. If children come from home where there are not a lot of language exposure, they have a more limited language experience when they enter school, that can contribute as well.

Introduction to our Dyslexia Webinar:

Discover the latest research on the processing weaknesses and early indicators in dyslexia.
Most importantly, find out how to use this information to help learners with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

This webinar is a mix of research and practical information that you can use in the classroom. You will Learn:

– The latest research on the processing weaknesses contributing to dyslexia.
– The identification of early indicators of dyslexia.
– How to use this information to help students with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

“A Revolutionary Computer Programme…”

 By  (Edit) Edit with Visual Composer

dyslexia-fast forword-neuron learning

One family, three children. The education psychologist was astonished by the positive results. As their father says“They’ve more of an interest in reading. Their comprehension is probably where they have most

Dyslexia, Home Programs, Fast ForWord, Reading Assistantexcelled.They no longer need learning support in school.” This article in The Independent shows what is possible.


Get Your Free Report on Dyslexia

In this report you will learn:

  • The Four Information Processing Skills Students Need to Learn Efficiently.
  • Why Good Language is Essential for Reading Well.
  • Why Phonics Matter AND What Other Essential Skills are Needed
  • Four Proven Neuroscience Principles to develop a “Reading Brain”
  • The latest research from universities such as Harvard and Stanford Universities on Poor Reading and Dyslexia.

Hard work commitment and a revolutionary computer programme helped the four Dunne children cope with dyslexia, writes Emma Nolan

It’s hard to believe that Albert Einstein and Leonardo DaVinci could have anything in common with Tom Cruise. Or even with Richard Branson, but they do. It’s the same thing they all have in common with the Dunne family from Kildare — they all have some form of dyslexia.

It’s estimated that dyslexia affects between six and eight per cent of the population, making it quite common. It is defined as a specific learning difficulty which makes it hard for some people to learn, write and spell correctly, despite their intelligence, motivation and education. John and Mary Dunne’s four children, Denis, 12, Kieran, 11, Brian, 9, and Maria, 7,were each assessed with a specific learning difficulty, making school and home life very difficult for all the family.

But a revolutionary computer programme has turned all their lives around. Because of their dyslexia, it was recommended that each Dunne child get 20 minutes’ reading support in school with a learning-support teacher, so they would not fall behind. “The kids read things differently; sometimes the words on the paper are jumbled up. Their brain doesn’t pick up the smaller words, like “the’ “a” and “and’ whereas they can pick up bigger words. Their reading would have been quite slow too and their comprehension wasn’t good at all. They could read a paragraph but then, because they read it at such a slow pace, you could ask them a question about it and they wouldn’t be able to answer it,” says Mary.   Knowing that the 20 minutes’ support a day wasn’t going to give her children all the assistance they required, Mary looked to the Internet for inspiration, and found a ground- breaking American programme for children with learning disabilities called Fast ForWord.

The programme — which involves a combination of at-home work with special software, plus assessment— helps improve short- and long-term memory, which is essential for word recognition. It improves students’ concentration and attention, allowing them to focus on a task. It also strengthens processing skills and improves sequencing.

See Case Study here

Webinar: EFFECTS OF POVERTY ON SCHOOL SUCCESS

Introduction:

Join Dr. Martha Burns as she reviews the newest research and provides research on how the Fast ForWord intervention has been found to have a significant impact on academic achievement in children of poverty.

You Should Learn:

  • Several new studies have shown that students from families below the poverty line are at the greatest risk for academic failure.
  • Research reveals that low family income has a bigger impact on academics than ethnicity or English language proficiency

INDEX:

KEY POINTS
• Children raised in poverty are exposed to millions of fewer spoken words at home
• Income level negatively impacts cognitive functions
• There are links between family income and memory and attention
• Poverty is associated with chronic stress which can have a toxic effect on brain architecture
• Boys are more impacted than girls
• English language learners often have a triple jeopardy – language barrier to learning, history of poverty, learning disabilities
• Fast ForWord targets the skills that are impacted and can turn around some effects of poverty.

 

 

About the Presenter

Dr Martha Burns is an expert on how children learn and has written 3 books and over 100 articles. She is an associate professor on the Northwest university in the USA.

Overview

Title:  Effects of Poverty on School Success

Originally broadcast Date: Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Duration: 1 hour

There are several ways in which family income impacts children neurologically:

  1. Children raised in poverty are exposed to millions of fewer spoken words at home.

Human brain maturation is experience-dependent. One of the most important times for experience to mold the brain is from early childhood through the elementary school years. So, the less language a child is exposed to, the fewer opportunities the brain has to develop language skills.

In their groundbreaking research published in 1995, Betty Hart and Todd Risley demonstrated that by age 4, children born into low socio-economic families are exposed to 30 million fewer words than those born into high socio-economic families. This means that the brain of a child in poverty has had 30 million fewer opportunities to wire itself for language.

  1. Weaknesses in oral language can lead to significant reading gaps.

Linguistic impoverishment deprives a child of receiving the auditory neural stimulation required to establish distinct phoneme representations, build vocabulary, and develop age appropriate oral language skills. This gap widens as children progress through school. Longitudinal research has shown that even when children are equated in reading ability at age 5, by age 13, children who had low oral language development when they entered school are more than five years behind in reading compared to their peers with high oral language skills.

  1. A low income level can negatively impact cognitive functions.

Language function in the brain isn’t the only casualty of poverty. Many other cognitive skills are affected, too.

Kimberly Noble has been studying the effects of poverty on cognitive development and brain structure for over a decade. As early as 2005, with M. Frank Norman and Martha Farah, she published research on the relationship between socioeconomic status and specific cognitive functions. Her findings showed that children who come from homes of poverty have limitations in a range of cognitive skills, including long- and short-term (working) memory, visual and spatial skills, executive functions like self-control, and the ability to learn from reward.

  1. Family income is linked to memory and attention.

More recently, Noble and Elizabeth Sowell have found compelling links between family income and brain structure — especially affecting areas of the brain important for memory and attention, which are essential for learning. In a Nature Neuroscience article published March 30, 2015, they reported that among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in brain surface area. In contrast, among children from higher-income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills. This research implies that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children.

  1. Developmental differences in the brain have consequences for academic achievement.

Further, on July 20, 2015, a Reuters Health article reported on a new study suggesting that the effect of poverty on children’s brains may explain why poor students tend to score lower on standardized tests compared to wealthier students. Seth Pollak and his colleagues reported in JAMA Pediatrics that about 20% of the gap in test scores between poor children and middle-class children may be a result of maturational lags in the frontal and temporal lobes.

How educators can help reverse these effects

The new research begs the question, “Are children raised in poverty doomed to educational struggle, no matter how well we teach?” The answer, fortunately, is a resounding “No!”

Neuroscience has not only clarified the problems caused by poverty, but provides solutions as well. In a recently published report titled “Using Brain Science to Design Pathways Out of Poverty,” Beth Babcock argues that because those areas of the brain affected by the adverse experiences of poverty and trauma remain plastic well into adulthood, neuroscience research offers promise for methodologies that can improve brain development and function. In her report, Babcock advocates, in part, for the use of “computer games” designed to “improve memory, focus and attention, impulse control, organization, problem solving, and multi-tasking skills [that] are now widely available and beginning to create positive outcomes.”

Indeed, well-designed neuroscience-based technology can build the underlying capacities that are reduced in children of poverty. For example, the Fast ForWord program, which was designed by neuroscientists at UCSF and Rutgers and tested for over a decade in many school districts with high poverty rates, has been repeatedly shown to increase academic performance in districts with high poverty levels. The beginning levels of the program target attention, memory, processing and sequencing skills — core cognitive skills essential for learning. Later levels then add specific technological instruction in reading comprehension, spelling, phonological awareness, and decoding, while also building in components to continue to build attention and memory skills.

The path out of poverty

Poverty is toxic to the developing human brain and thereby endangers academic success. Education offers students the key to a path out of poverty — but only when their brains are ready to receive it.

Children who haven’t acquired sufficient foundational perceptual, cognitive or linguistic skills require explicit “catch-up” interventions in these areas before traditional classroom instruction and reading instruction can be effective. Neuroscience now offers not only an explanation of the problem but solutions that can change the brains of all students to enable learning.