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1. Learn the Dos and Don’ts

Know the Dyslexia Do’s and Don’ts to make your school an optimal learning environment for students showing signs of dyslexia.

Do:
• Screen and test for dyslexia.
Proper treatment can only follow an accurate diagnosis. Different types of dyslexia will need different
intervention planning.
• Take a strengths-based approach to dyslexia.
Rather than viewing students with dyslexia through a deficits model, recognize their strengths. Research
has found that those with dyslexia are strong in spatial reasoning, narrative reasoning, empathy, and
critical thinking.
• Allow modified or alternative assessments.
Give the option of an oral book review or spelling test instead of a written one. Include a variety of ways to
respond to test questions, like circling an answer or making a voice recording, rather than fill-in-the-blank
or short answers.
• Don’t take off points for spelling errors if it’s not a spelling test.
A reading comprehension quiz evaluates reading comprehension, not spelling. Give students a fair chance
to demonstrate their learning.
• Offer extra time on assignments and tests.
Allow students to take home in-class assignments. Offer more time, a quiet area or a separate room for
taking exams. Or, to avoid the stigma of being singled out, give the entire class extra time to complete an
exam and have students who finish early work on other assignments.
• Create opportunities for multisensory learning.
Practice writing with putty, sand, pipe cleaners, or beads. Have students perform skits or puppet shows
about the assigned reading. Incorporate music and aromatherapy into the classroom environment.

2.  Five Ways Technology can help

  • Speech-to-text software For writing assignments, students can use a voice recognition tool that converts spoken words into typed sentences on the screen
  • Text-to-speech software Reading everything from books to worksheets can be made easier by being converted to audio files.  
  • Smart pens LiveScribe™ SmartPen digitizes the notes that a student writes in a notebook while also recording the lecture.
  • Computer games that target phonological processing Because dyslexia is primarily an auditory disorder, students should use a program that strengthens phonological processing.
  • Spell checker Spelling check apps that are especially helpful for students with dyslexia include American WordSpeller™ and Typ-O HD.

 

3. Checklist of Dyslexia Signs

Do you think one or more of your students might have some form of dyslexia? It can be difficult to spot because it’s a spectrum disorder and looks a little different on everyone. To help you decide who to recommend for a dyslexia screening and evaluation by a qualified professional, here is a checklist of dyslexia symptoms to look for by age

 Five Ways Technology can help

  • Speech-to-text software For writing assignments, students can use a voice recognition tool that converts spoken words into typed sentences on the screen
  • Text-to-speech software Reading everything from books to worksheets can be made easier by being converted to audio files.  
  • Smart pens LiveScribe™ SmartPen digitizes the notes that a student writes in a notebook while also recording the lecture.
  • Computer games that target phonological processing Because dyslexia is primarily an auditory disorder, students should use a program that strengthens phonological processing.
  • Spell checker Spelling check apps that are especially helpful for students with dyslexia include American WordSpeller™ and Typ-O HD.

 

3. Checklist of Dyslexia Signs

Do you think one or more of your students might have some form of dyslexia? It can be difficult to spot because it’s a spectrum disorder and looks a little different on everyone. To help you decide who to recommend for a dyslexia screening and evaluation by a qualified professional, here is a checklist of dyslexia symptoms to look for by age