Evidence of Effectiveness – Deep Diving into MySciLEARN Reports


Deep Diving into MyScilearn Reports
Is about deep data and how we are applying Smart Technology to our products for you to understand your students’ progress better.
It is a practical session directed at educators who use Fast ForWord programs and a good overview for those of you who want to see the power of data analysis in teaching.

You should learn:

(1) The Key Indicators to monitor for student success.

(2) The identification of each student’s individual needs.

(3) How to save valuable time by automating the preparation and communication of reports!

What if you could reach every struggling reader at your school with exactly the skills they need at just the right time? What if these students started to improve quickly, were self-motivated, and worked more independently?
Learn how the new version of the evidence-based Fast ForWord reading intervention program will bring a dramatic difference to your students this year, and provide you with one option to meet the needs of multiple student subgroups.

Overview

Title: Training Webinar – Deep Diving into MySciLEARN Reports!

Originally broadcast Date:  Thursday, September 27, 2018

Duration: 1 hour

Speaker Bio

Tom Chapin

Professional Development Manager

Scientific Learning

Fast ForWord language and reading intervention allows educators, parents, and clinical providers to easily track a learner’s progress. MySciLEARN reports and Reading Progress Indicator assessments ensure every learner receives the appropriate guidance and support necessary to become a better reader and better student.

 

MySciLEARN Reports

 

MySciLEARN reports are online data analysis and reporting tools tha

[spacer t track individual learner, classroom, school, and district level performance.

  • Automatically analyzes individual and group learning progress, including diagnostic and prescriptive information, displayed in graphs and tables
  • Offers timely and specific intervention guidance, providing recommendations to maximize the impact of classroom reading instruction and the effectiveness of the Fast ForWord reading intervention program
  • Provides future forecasting with insights into the potential effects Fast ForWord can have on a school district’s performance in as little as 1 year.

Autism and Brain Plasticity: 2018 Research

 

The FACTS:

1. Autism is Highly Heritable. This means that autism is frequently, but not always, passed down from one generation to another. Because of the complexity of the human genome (DNA set), gene mutations can also be responsible for a child developing autism even if autism does not run in his or her family.

 2. Autism is Not Caused by IQ Deficiency. Two-thirds of those diagnosed with autism possess average or above-average intellectual ability.

3. Genes Overlap. We see a genetic correlation of autism with other disordered traits such as depression and ADHD.

4. Brain Connectivity Problems Precede Autism. Autism does not create brain connectivity problems. Instead, autism stems from an underdeveloped cerebral cortex, the part of the brain responsible for relaying and interpreting messages. There may be other causes as well, such as protein synthesis issues or core brain area dysfunction. For example, a dysfunctional hypothalamus, which regulates sleep, may play a role in the development of autism.

5. There is Still Much to Learn About How and Why Autism Develops. Since every child’s DNA is unique and complex, the causes of autism are difficult to pinpoint.

The INTERVENTION:

1. The Earlier the Diagnosis, the Better. Autism Spectrum Disorder begins to develop in utero. Auditory scans performed on infants show that auditory brain stem response is slower in those with Autism Spectrum Disorder. We may be able to use this information to start early, intensive intervention, which benefits children over the long-haul.

2. Behavioral Treatment Must be Adaptable and Individualized. Targeting a child’s specific learning difficulties ensures a higher probability of improvement. Language learning exercises must be repetitive and intensive over time to unlock learning barriers and rewire the brain for language acquisition.

3. Abundant Social Interaction is Vital. Children need plenty of help learning social skills in order to develop appropriate language skills. Time spent interacting with others in different scenarios and interacting with animals is important.

4. Intervention is Crucial During Prime Learning Windows. The brain is most plastic (and able to learn and retain new information) between birth and 4 years of age and again during adolescence. Regular, rigorous learning must occur for children to make significant strides towards language skills improvement all throughout their life, but in particular at those ages.

5. Learning Programs and Behavior Therapy are an Integral Part of Any Autism Intervention. For children ages 2 ½-4 years-old, Dr. Burns recommends Kiko’s Thinking Time by Kiko Labs. As students get older, she regards the award-winning Fast ForWord program as a powerful learning tool.

Fast ForWord is an Optimal Learning Program for Children Diagnosed with Autism. 

Dr. Burns highlights the effectiveness of Fast ForWord for children with autism, specifically how it can improve the language abilities of learners with differing levels of need, since it personalizes to each person’s strengths and weaknesses. Fast ForWord was recently commended by the Council of Administrators of Special Education (CASE) for its “continuing improvements,” “updates and enhancements,” and its results—it “enables students with learning disabilities to achieve quick and lasting learning gains.”

Perhaps one of the more impressive aspects of Fast ForWord is its how it addresses both underlying cognitive and literacy skills in children ages five and up. This combination of exercises leads to improvements not only in expressive and receptive language, but also in social skills, attention, and more. 81% of parents reported improvement in a field study.

Free Webinar View Here Click here

 

Leadership and Classroom Secrets to Help Struggling Readers Achieve

Webinar

Leadership and Classroom Secrets to Help Struggling Readers Achieve

By Dr. Eric Jensen

The achievement gap between rich students and poor students continues to be a major problem in our schools.

Discover how learning environments and different teaching strategies impact brain development, and what school leaders and educators can do to help students of poverty catch up to their peers once and for all.

Dr. Jensen is a leader in brain-based learning and author of several best-selling books, including Poor Students, Rich Teaching.

If you are looking for ways to boost your students performance, Please see the full webinar.

Download Slides Here

Download Certificate Here

About the Presenter:

Eric Jensen is a former teacher with a real love of learning. He has taught at all levels, from elementary school through university, and he is currently completing his doctorate in human development.

In 1981, Jensen co-founded the United States’ first and largest brain-compatible learning program, now with more than 50,000 graduates. He has since written Teaching with the Brain in Mind, Brain-Based Learning, Enriching the Brain, and 25 other books on learning and the brain.

Jensen is currently a member of the Society for Neuroscience and the New York Academy of Sciences. He was the founder of the Learning Brain EXPO and has trained educators and trainers worldwide in this field for 25 years.

He is deeply committed to making a positive, lasting difference in the way we learn. Currently, he speaks at conferences and conducts in-school professional development on poverty and engagement.

 

Webinar – New Science of Learning for Struggling Readers

Fasr ForWord, Neuron English

 

Fasr ForWord, Neuron English

Webinar – New Science of Learning for Struggling Readers

Presenter: Martha S. Burns, Ph.D.
Date/Time: Monday September 11, 2017, 9pm London UK
Length: 60 minutes
No Charge/Free

Updated with 2017 research, this is a must-see for those interested in how neuroscience is impacting education. See the latest research on how the brain is organized (or not!) for reading, and what’s happening with your struggling students. We’ll show how the science of learning has guided the development of technologies like Fast ForWord to improve the underlying memory, attention, and processing abilities that these students need to catch up, once and for all.

Marty Burns, Reading Assistant

 

 

Train children with autism to become better with emotion recognition and production.

Lets Face It

Train children with autism to become better with emotion recognition and production.

One of our colleagues, Dr. Paula Tallal, has shared a free app with us that some of her colleagues at the Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center (TDLC) have been working for many years to train children with autism to become better with emotion recognition and production.    

For the child on the autism spectrum, LFI! Scrapbook is serious fun! The platform is a powerful educational tool for learning faces and recognizing emotions of the important people in their lives..

The four challenging games are free.

Click Here to Get Your Free App

Lets Face It

 

Click Here to Get Your Free App

Developed for children on the autism spectrum, the player uses the iPad’s built-in camera to take pictures and videos of their friends, family and classmates. The player labels the images and organizes them into personalized albums that provide content for the LFI! games. The app includes four challenging games (Splash, NameGame, Memory and Fuse) that have uniquely themed levels, and even a few hidden tricks!

 

 

Effects of Poverty on School Success

Presenter: Martha S. Burns, Ph.D.
 Length:  Extract 8 minutes (total 60 minutes)

Several new studies have shown that students from families below the poverty line are at the greatest risk for academic failure. Research reveals that low family income has a bigger impact on academics than ethnicity or English language proficiency. In this extract Dr. Martha Burns reviews the newest research and provides research on how the Fast ForWord intervention has been found to have a significant impact on academic achievement in children of poverty.

 

 

 

A famous 1995 study by Hart and Risley demonstrated that by the age of four, children from poor households hear 32 million fewer spoken words than their better-off peers. More recent research has shown that quality of conversation differs as well. Parents with higher education and income are more likely to engage children with questions and dialogue that invite creative responses, while parents in poverty often lack the time and energy for anything more than simple and goal-oriented commands.

 

The 32 Million Word Gap  – Cognitive Functions – The Negative Impact of Stress – Hart and Risley Research

Please Send Me the Slides for the Effect of Poverty on School Success Webinar

 

Effects of Poverty on School Success

Key Points

  • Children of poverty are exposed to millions of fewer words before they enter school.
  • Income level negatively impacts the ability to learn specific cognitive skills.
  • Cognitive skills like memory and attention are really affected by poverty.
  • Poverty is associated with chronic stress
  • Children who are English language learners have a double jeopardy
  • Neuroscience, computer games that target the skills impacted by poverty in ways that teachers can’t in a classroom.

3 PARTS of the BRAIN MOST EFFECTED BY POVERTY

First and foremost the language areas of the brain were not as well developed. Secondly the reading area of the brain that’s the purple regions entired to the language area were not as well developed and the surface area wasn’t as large.

Executive functions which is your ability to have self control to listen on demand, to remember everything that is going on around you, those aren’t as well developed.

And visual spatial skills aren’t as well developed. So it’s not that the brains aren’t as smart, it’s not as though the children’s brain are not developing, they are developing. But, they are not developing in areas that are important for learning in school.

TRANSCRIPTION

Effects of Poverty on School Success

Key Points

  • Children of poverty number one you may know this from the Hart and Risley researchers are exposed to millions of fewer words, they are actually about 32 million fewer words before they enter school.
  • That income level does negatively impact the ability to learn specific cognitive skills.
  • Cognitive skills like memory and attention are really affected by poverty.
  • Poverty is associated with chronic stress and again if you read Eric Jensen book or if you are aware of it “teaching with poverty in mind”, he talks a lot about the impact of poverty on learning but also how poverty is associated with stress and the negative impact of stress and I will show you that research too.
  • We will talk about how many children who are English language learners have a double jeopardy or even triple jeopardy – they do have poverty, high poverty rates often times as well as learning the second language in school.

Finally, we are going to talk about the use of computer based activities – neuroscience, computer games that target the skills impacted by poverty in ways that teachers can’t in a classroom. So you can augment what the teacher does.

HART and RISLEY
Let’s just begin with the Hart and Risley research, it was published in the 1990’s as you know and the book was language experiences of young children and this is a graph that simply shows you, along the horizontal axis you see we are looking at an age up to 48months. So we are looking at children from birth to 48 months and how much talking goes on in a home. If a child comes from your home, you are a professional, then that child is exposed to well over 40 million words. But if a child comes from a home below the poverty line, in the first 4 years of life, they are only exposed to 13 million words. That is a huge gap. That is over 30 million fewer words that the child hears before they enter school. Now the problem with that is that the brain is an experience dependent organ. So if the child is coming into school with fewer experiences with language, then the language skills are obvious are affected. Their oral language skills.

HIRSCH 
We know that research by Hirsch that you see in this slide, shows that when children enter kindergarten with low oral language skills the gap widens. That is largely because when there are sitting in a classroom a lot of what the teacher is saying is going over their head. They are just not hearing it, they are not paying attention to it or they are tuning out a lot because they’re listening is not their strength, they don’t have a brain that is good at language yet and so they are not benefiting the way the students who have good language skills are from classroom instruction and hence their vocabulary gap just continues to get wider.

KIMBERLEY NOBLE
Let’s look at the impact of poverty on other skills besides language. We know from research that was done about 10 years ago by Kimberly Noble, that when children are below the poverty line, they also have in addition to language – that big brown line that you see on the line graph/bar graph, but  there are also problems with working memory and they have problems with cognitive control. I want to explain these briefly.

Working memory – you may know well, but that is your ability to hold information in mind. So it is your ability right now because you are having to listen to me to remember what I said five minutes ago and to hold on to what I am saying now and keep it in mind as we progress through this session today.

Cognitive control – is the ability to pay attention to what I am saying and to not tune-out, and to listen on demand and also other kinds of self control. But, listening on demand, being able to sit in a classroom, being able to say to yourself that I am going to pay attention, I am going to ignore the other things going on around me. Those are severely affected by poverty. We have known that for over 10 years. But now in the last few years we have even newer research.

Just this last year, Kimberly Noble published another study where she looked at the thickness of the cortex. The thickness of the human brain, the outside crust of the human brain, where all the little dendrites are that connect up with other neurons and the cell bodies and that thickness of the cortex is a rough measure of what you are good at.  For example, if you are a very good artist, you would have a very thick visual cortex, if you are a musician you would have a very thick cortex on the right auditory regions of your brain. So thickness of the cortex kind of tells you how much experience you have had in something and also to some extend, how good you are, and so what she found when she looked at this measures of the cortex, a new kind of technology that is available – that small differences in income were associated with very large differences in surface brain area, and that children from higher income family, children from your family and my family and Donald Trump’s family really have very little differences in our brain. So once you get above the poverty line, well stuff doesn’t seem to affect this cortical surface, but among children of poverty, it does.

PARTS OF THE BRAIN AFFECTED BY POVERTY

Let’s look at the specific structures that Noble found were affected of the parts of the brain that were affected by poverty.

First and foremost the language areas of the brain were not as well developed. Secondly the reading area of the brain that’s the purple regions entired to the language area were not as well developed and the surface area wasn’t as large.

Executive functions which is your ability to have self control to listen on demand, to remember everything that is going on around you, those aren’t as well developed.

And visual spatial skills aren’t as well developed. So it’s not that the brains aren’t as smart, it’s not as though the children’s brain are not developing, they are developing. But, they are not developing in areas that are important for learning in school.

Noble concluded that:

The research implies that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the very most disadvantaged student.

JOHN GABRIELLI

Later in April 2015 (last year) Dr John Gabrielli, he is at MIT and has been working at Scans of dyslexia and all sorts of different developmental differences.

Published research that corroborates what Noble showed. He showed, that high income, verses low income achievement differences directly correlate with cortical thickness in adolescent. So he was looking even beyond just the young children, that Noble was looking at, and looking at the parts of the brain that are affected most by income level, and these are the regions of the brain that you see on this slide, that are so important for school. But they are not important, that is interesting for things like sports and I will explain that later.

The parts of the brain that you need to be good at sports are different kind of skills and those are not affected by poverty, which I find very interesting.

POLLAK
Pollak also published research in June of 2015, that continue to corroborate this research showing a 20 percent gap in test scores between poor children and middle class children seems to be related to  the brain development in these specific parts of the brain that are important for learning (frontal and temporal lobes)

Please Send Me the Slides for the Effect of Poverty on School Success Webinar