Webinar – Adding Neuroscience to Education – Can it Really Help?

neuroscience and education webinar neuron learning

Introduction:

You are ready to teach your students. But how can you help your students become better learners? Whether the subject is maths, science, history or English langauge skills all students need to be effective learners.
 
Now you can help your students absorb your teaching more effectively

Including neuroscience in education has been a popular topic in recent years but some people still have questions and would like to learn more about its usefulness and how it works.

You’ll learn:-

  • The 4 cognitive skills all learners need to have to learn effectively and optimally.
  • The FAST formula to make sure you hit the right levels of participation, to personalise the learning experience and build in motivation and blending of skills.
  • What technology can do to help you supplement your classroom instruction
  • The latest research into neuroscience and learning
  • And lots more in this new webinar.

What science says about why certain children struggle with language and reading, and others don’t — there are hidden factors at play.

THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY

Well-designed neuroscience technologies can address foundational cognitive skills essential to academic success and
promote life skills (executive functions)

NO MORE BAND-AIDS ON READING PROBLEMS

Fast ForWord uses a new 3-step process for fast reading results:


1. PREPARE the foundation for reading

• Targets missing skills and addresses weaknesses that other programs and methods don’t
(memory, attention, processing speed, listening accuracy, etc.)


2. PRACTICE language and reading skills

• Your child receives 1000s of personalized practice opportunities – this is more intensive
than any other approach and how to get far better results
• Adjusts to every click of the mouse or touch on an iPad
• Keeps your child at 80% success, 20% challenge


3. REINFORCE new reading skills

• As your child reads aloud, the Reading Assistant program listens and provides corrective
reading feedback. This real-world reading reinforces newly learned skills and rapidly builds
fluency and comprehension.

About the Speaker 

Mrs. Armes holds a Bachelor’s degree in both general and special education and a Master’s degree in Special Education with certification in the areas of Educational Diagnostician and Mid-Management.

Overview

Title: Adding Neuroscience to Education – Can it Really Help?

Originally broadcast Date: Thursday, May 30th, 2018

Duration: 40 minutes

Webinar: Breaking Bad: Tackling Behaviour Problems at the Core

Introduction:

We often see behaviours at school that are detrimental to both the students exhibiting the behaviour and those around them. Many times, inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity and even aggression may be more than a student demonstrating that he or she is bored, acting out or seeking attention.
These behavioural issues interfere with student learning because they are disruptive or consume a lot of class time, but have we truly considered what foundational issues are behind those actions?
What if we could address the actual core problems causing those behaviours rather than just continually dealing with the symptoms?

You Should Learn:

INDEX:

KEY POINTS

About the Presenter

Dr Martha Burns is an expert on how children learn and has written 3 books and over 100 articles. She is an associate professor on the Northwest university in the USA.

Overview

Title: 

Originally broadcast Date: Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Duration: 1 hour

Reading Assistant – Getting Started

 

Innovative Online Guided Reading Tool

Reading Assistant is an innovative online guided reading tool that provides intensive reading practice. Learners use the tool to read developmentally appropriate texts both silently and aloud. What makes Reading Assistant such an innovative reading practice tool is its use of patented technology that listens as each word is read aloud and delivers immediate support whenever a learner struggles with or mispronounces a word — reinforcing newly learned reading skills, vocabulary, and fluency.

What Reading Assistant Does

Provides Guided Reading Support to More Students

Reading Assistant uses patented speech recognition technology to deliver real-time corrective guided reading feedback, enabling learners to self-correct as they are reading aloud.

Improves Both Silent Reading and Oral Reading Skills

Unlike other digital reading practice resources that only allow learners to record themselves reading aloud, Reading Assistant actually listens and helps learners whenever they struggle or mispronounce a word — it’s like having a personal guided reading tutor available 24/7!

Reading Assistant Saves Teachers Time

Automatic calculation of words correct per minute (WCPM), and actionable comprehension and vocabulary reports make it easy for teachers to track learners’ reading levels, and specific areas of strength and weakness.

Pre-teaches Academic Vocabulary

Built-in Word Wall activities pre-teach academic vocabulary, activate prior knowledge, and provide pronunciations for new words before learners begin each e-book passage.

Reading Assistant Reaches the Reluctant Reader

Reading Assistant provides reading selections for a variety of interests and reading levels, plus frequent comprehension checks, to keep learners motivated and focused on reading for meaning as well as building reading fluency.

 

Click here to get free demo access

Reading Assistant Word Wall

 

Reading Assistant – Word Wall

 

 

Over 300 Reading Pieces in Your Library

 

 

Easy-to-Use Reports and Indicators

 

Reading Assistant provides implementation and performance reporting at the district, group, and student level to support and improve data-driven decision making. Graphical depictions show usage, performance, reading level trends, and student proficiency levels.

2018 Dyslexia – A Multi-Deficit Approach

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Click here to view the full Webinar

A Multi-Deficit approach to Dyslexia is now considered the most accurate way to understand causation.

So, the view now of Dyslexia

isn’t that it’s caused by one thing, it’s not caused by reversing letters, Visually. It isn’t caused by just one thing, but it actually has several different factors that can contribute to it.

  • One is Genetics, we will talk about that. But we know that children who come from families where there is a brother or a sister or a mother or a father or even an aunt or uncle that had reading problems are much more genetically inclined toward having reading problems themselves and some genes have been identified.
  • Secondly, we know there are Brain Level Differences. We know that children with dyslexia process information differently in the brain. When we look at brain function on functional imaging process information differently than children who don’t have reading issues. We will talk about that.
  • There are these Perceptual Cognitive Level issues and those are speech sounds perception also includes visual perception also includes memory skills, working memory, auditory phonological memory skills and skills like processing speed and we will talk about that, those cognitive level differences.
  • Then there are Environmental Factors. If children come from home where there are not a lot of language exposure, they have a more limited language experience when they enter school, that can contribute as well.

Introduction to our Dyslexia Webinar:

Discover the latest research on the processing weaknesses and early indicators in dyslexia.
Most importantly, find out how to use this information to help learners with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

This webinar is a mix of research and practical information that you can use in the classroom. You will Learn:

– The latest research on the processing weaknesses contributing to dyslexia.
– The identification of early indicators of dyslexia.
– How to use this information to help students with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

“A Revolutionary Computer Programme…”

 By  (Edit) Edit with Visual Composer

dyslexia-fast forword-neuron learning

One family, three children. The education psychologist was astonished by the positive results. As their father says“They’ve more of an interest in reading. Their comprehension is probably where they have most

Dyslexia, Home Programs, Fast ForWord, Reading Assistantexcelled.They no longer need learning support in school.” This article in The Independent shows what is possible.


Get Your Free Report on Dyslexia

In this report you will learn:

  • The Four Information Processing Skills Students Need to Learn Efficiently.
  • Why Good Language is Essential for Reading Well.
  • Why Phonics Matter AND What Other Essential Skills are Needed
  • Four Proven Neuroscience Principles to develop a “Reading Brain”
  • The latest research from universities such as Harvard and Stanford Universities on Poor Reading and Dyslexia.

Hard work commitment and a revolutionary computer programme helped the four Dunne children cope with dyslexia, writes Emma Nolan

It’s hard to believe that Albert Einstein and Leonardo DaVinci could have anything in common with Tom Cruise. Or even with Richard Branson, but they do. It’s the same thing they all have in common with the Dunne family from Kildare — they all have some form of dyslexia.

It’s estimated that dyslexia affects between six and eight per cent of the population, making it quite common. It is defined as a specific learning difficulty which makes it hard for some people to learn, write and spell correctly, despite their intelligence, motivation and education. John and Mary Dunne’s four children, Denis, 12, Kieran, 11, Brian, 9, and Maria, 7,were each assessed with a specific learning difficulty, making school and home life very difficult for all the family.

But a revolutionary computer programme has turned all their lives around. Because of their dyslexia, it was recommended that each Dunne child get 20 minutes’ reading support in school with a learning-support teacher, so they would not fall behind. “The kids read things differently; sometimes the words on the paper are jumbled up. Their brain doesn’t pick up the smaller words, like “the’ “a” and “and’ whereas they can pick up bigger words. Their reading would have been quite slow too and their comprehension wasn’t good at all. They could read a paragraph but then, because they read it at such a slow pace, you could ask them a question about it and they wouldn’t be able to answer it,” says Mary.   Knowing that the 20 minutes’ support a day wasn’t going to give her children all the assistance they required, Mary looked to the Internet for inspiration, and found a ground- breaking American programme for children with learning disabilities called Fast ForWord.

The programme — which involves a combination of at-home work with special software, plus assessment— helps improve short- and long-term memory, which is essential for word recognition. It improves students’ concentration and attention, allowing them to focus on a task. It also strengthens processing skills and improves sequencing.

See Case Study here

Webinar: EFFECTS OF POVERTY ON SCHOOL SUCCESS

Introduction:

Join Dr. Martha Burns as she reviews the newest research and provides research on how the Fast ForWord intervention has been found to have a significant impact on academic achievement in children of poverty.

You Should Learn:

  • Several new studies have shown that students from families below the poverty line are at the greatest risk for academic failure.
  • Research reveals that low family income has a bigger impact on academics than ethnicity or English language proficiency

INDEX:

KEY POINTS
• Children raised in poverty are exposed to millions of fewer spoken words at home
• Income level negatively impacts cognitive functions
• There are links between family income and memory and attention
• Poverty is associated with chronic stress which can have a toxic effect on brain architecture
• Boys are more impacted than girls
• English language learners often have a triple jeopardy – language barrier to learning, history of poverty, learning disabilities
• Fast ForWord targets the skills that are impacted and can turn around some effects of poverty.

 

 

About the Presenter

Dr Martha Burns is an expert on how children learn and has written 3 books and over 100 articles. She is an associate professor on the Northwest university in the USA.

Overview

Title:  Effects of Poverty on School Success

Originally broadcast Date: Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Duration: 1 hour

There are several ways in which family income impacts children neurologically:

  1. Children raised in poverty are exposed to millions of fewer spoken words at home.

Human brain maturation is experience-dependent. One of the most important times for experience to mold the brain is from early childhood through the elementary school years. So, the less language a child is exposed to, the fewer opportunities the brain has to develop language skills.

In their groundbreaking research published in 1995, Betty Hart and Todd Risley demonstrated that by age 4, children born into low socio-economic families are exposed to 30 million fewer words than those born into high socio-economic families. This means that the brain of a child in poverty has had 30 million fewer opportunities to wire itself for language.

  1. Weaknesses in oral language can lead to significant reading gaps.

Linguistic impoverishment deprives a child of receiving the auditory neural stimulation required to establish distinct phoneme representations, build vocabulary, and develop age appropriate oral language skills. This gap widens as children progress through school. Longitudinal research has shown that even when children are equated in reading ability at age 5, by age 13, children who had low oral language development when they entered school are more than five years behind in reading compared to their peers with high oral language skills.

  1. A low income level can negatively impact cognitive functions.

Language function in the brain isn’t the only casualty of poverty. Many other cognitive skills are affected, too.

Kimberly Noble has been studying the effects of poverty on cognitive development and brain structure for over a decade. As early as 2005, with M. Frank Norman and Martha Farah, she published research on the relationship between socioeconomic status and specific cognitive functions. Her findings showed that children who come from homes of poverty have limitations in a range of cognitive skills, including long- and short-term (working) memory, visual and spatial skills, executive functions like self-control, and the ability to learn from reward.

  1. Family income is linked to memory and attention.

More recently, Noble and Elizabeth Sowell have found compelling links between family income and brain structure — especially affecting areas of the brain important for memory and attention, which are essential for learning. In a Nature Neuroscience article published March 30, 2015, they reported that among children from lower income families, small differences in income were associated with relatively large differences in brain surface area. In contrast, among children from higher-income families, similar income increments were associated with smaller differences in surface area. These relationships were most prominent in regions supporting language, reading, executive functions and spatial skills. This research implies that income relates most strongly to brain structure among the most disadvantaged children.

  1. Developmental differences in the brain have consequences for academic achievement.

Further, on July 20, 2015, a Reuters Health article reported on a new study suggesting that the effect of poverty on children’s brains may explain why poor students tend to score lower on standardized tests compared to wealthier students. Seth Pollak and his colleagues reported in JAMA Pediatrics that about 20% of the gap in test scores between poor children and middle-class children may be a result of maturational lags in the frontal and temporal lobes.

How educators can help reverse these effects

The new research begs the question, “Are children raised in poverty doomed to educational struggle, no matter how well we teach?” The answer, fortunately, is a resounding “No!”

Neuroscience has not only clarified the problems caused by poverty, but provides solutions as well. In a recently published report titled “Using Brain Science to Design Pathways Out of Poverty,” Beth Babcock argues that because those areas of the brain affected by the adverse experiences of poverty and trauma remain plastic well into adulthood, neuroscience research offers promise for methodologies that can improve brain development and function. In her report, Babcock advocates, in part, for the use of “computer games” designed to “improve memory, focus and attention, impulse control, organization, problem solving, and multi-tasking skills [that] are now widely available and beginning to create positive outcomes.”

Indeed, well-designed neuroscience-based technology can build the underlying capacities that are reduced in children of poverty. For example, the Fast ForWord program, which was designed by neuroscientists at UCSF and Rutgers and tested for over a decade in many school districts with high poverty rates, has been repeatedly shown to increase academic performance in districts with high poverty levels. The beginning levels of the program target attention, memory, processing and sequencing skills — core cognitive skills essential for learning. Later levels then add specific technological instruction in reading comprehension, spelling, phonological awareness, and decoding, while also building in components to continue to build attention and memory skills.

The path out of poverty

Poverty is toxic to the developing human brain and thereby endangers academic success. Education offers students the key to a path out of poverty — but only when their brains are ready to receive it.

Children who haven’t acquired sufficient foundational perceptual, cognitive or linguistic skills require explicit “catch-up” interventions in these areas before traditional classroom instruction and reading instruction can be effective. Neuroscience now offers not only an explanation of the problem but solutions that can change the brains of all students to enable learning.

 

The Birth of Neuroplasticity Interventions: A Twenty Year Perspective

Abstract

Fast ForWord® was the first, computer/Internet delivered, neuroplasticity-based training program ever developed to enhance neural performance. It grew out of over 25 years of basic and clinical research in two distinct scientific disciplines.


One utilized behavioral, electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods to study individual differences in language development and the etiology of developmental language-based learning disabilities (including Specific Language Impairment, Autism and Dyslexia).

The other utilized neurophysiological and behavioral methods in animals to study neuroplasticity, that is, changes at the cellular level driven by behavioral training techniques.

This chapter reviews (1) how these two lines of research were integrated to form the scientific basis of Fast ForWord® and (2) the steps taken to translate and instantiate our collaborative laboratory research into clinical and classroom interventionsthat could be scaled up for broad distribution around the world, while remaining efficient, effective and enduring. In 1996, Scientific Learning Corporation (SLC) was co-founded by four research scientists (Paula Tallal, Michael Merzenich, William Jenkins and Steve Miller).

To date, nearly three million children in 55 countries have received Fast ForWord® interventions. On any given school day approximately 100,000 children log in to train on one of twelve Fast ForWord®Language, Literacy or Reading programs. More recently, Fast ForWord® language and reading programs are being used increasingly as an effective method for improving English as a second language (ESL), including success for ESL children whose first language is non-alphabetic.

Introduction

When we began our collaboration in 1993, the now rapidly growing fields of “cognitive neurotherapeutics” and “neuroeducation” did not exist, nor did the concept of using neuroplasticity-based training to improve “brain fitness”. The methods we developed, and subsequently were the basis of over 50 patents, were the first to use video gaming technologies with the explicit goal of improving human performance.

Research on Language Development and Disorders

The most basic unit of any language is the phoneme, the smallest unit of sound that can change the meaning of a word. For alphabetic languages, in order to learn how to read and become a proficient reader the child must become aware that words can be segmented into smaller units of sound (phonemes) and it is these sounds that the letters represent. This is referred to as phonological awareness. Phonemes are the basic building blocks for spoken language, as well as for alphabetic written languages.

Research on Neuroplasticity-Based Training

Neurophysiologists have mapped the features of the sensory world at the single cell level. This research has shown that within each sensory modality the features that represent the physical world come to be mapped at the cellular level in a highly organized fashion.

The Birth of Fast ForWord®: Translating Theory into Practice

Considering the amount of speech directed to the infant, it is easy to understand how important speech is in shaping the auditory cortex during critical periods of human development.

Designing Neuroplasticity-Based Training Games

For our first study we designed and developed a series of verbal training exercises ranging from speech discrimination to grammatical comprehension, disguised as “games”. Some of these games were implemented on computers, while trained professionals using tape-recorded stimuli presented others.

The First Laboratory Studies: Rutgers Summer Camps 1994–1995

Our initial laboratory studies were conducted with children who each met the criteria for language learning impairment (LLI). Two groups matched on age, IQ and language skills were quasi-randomly assigned to receive the same language intervention program.

Scaling Up: The “Neurotherapeutic Revolution”

  • Fast ForWord® Language v1
  • First Multi-site Clinical Field Trial (1996–1997)
It is one thing to obtain results in well-controlled studies in a research laboratory under the direct supervision of skilled research scientists. It is quite another to demonstrate that efficacy can be achieve in “real-world” clinics and classrooms where children most commonly receive intervention. Soon after founding Scientific Learning Corporation (SLC) our first goal was to convert the games used in our laboratory studies into a fully computerized training program (Fast ForWord® Language v1), and then to conduct large-scale field trials in clinical and educational settings to assess its “real-world” efficacy.

Independent Agency Evaluations of Fast ForWord®

Studies on the effectiveness of educational and/or clinical interventions are inherently difficult, in part because of the many skill sets and multidisciplinary collaborations required to conduct these studies in “real- world” clinics and school settings. Before introducing a new method, curriculum or product, schools have to answer a practical question: does the new approach leads to better outcomes for their students than whatever intervention strategies they currently have in place? In translating research from the laboratory to classrooms, we have found that most school administrators and curriculum directors are only willing to make important decisions for their school after they have conducted their own, internal, independent study.

Cognitive Neurotherapeutics: The Challenges of Translation

The biggest challenge we have faced along our journey to translate our laboratory research into real world settings has been negotiating the torturous path between the world of our scientific colleagues, as compared to the very different world of K-12 educators and clinicians who make the decisions about whether our products will be offered to the children who could benefit from them. Nowhere have these different worlds collided more directly than when it comes to assessing and reporting the efficacy of Fast ForWord® products.

To Learn more about The Birth of Neuroplasticity Interventions. Download the PDF Article (there is a publishers charge)  Click here

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