Webinar: Breaking Bad: Tackling Behaviour Problems at the Core

Introduction:

We often see behaviours at school that are detrimental to both the students exhibiting the behaviour and those around them. Many times, inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity and even aggression may be more than a student demonstrating that he or she is bored, acting out or seeking attention.
These behavioural issues interfere with student learning because they are disruptive or consume a lot of class time, but have we truly considered what foundational issues are behind those actions?
What if we could address the actual core problems causing those behaviours rather than just continually dealing with the symptoms?

You Should Learn:

INDEX:

KEY POINTS

About the Presenter

Dr Martha Burns is an expert on how children learn and has written 3 books and over 100 articles. She is an associate professor on the Northwest university in the USA.

Overview

Title: 

Originally broadcast Date: Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Duration: 1 hour

Reading Assistant – Getting Started

 

Innovative Online Guided Reading Tool

Reading Assistant is an innovative online guided reading tool that provides intensive reading practice. Learners use the tool to read developmentally appropriate texts both silently and aloud. What makes Reading Assistant such an innovative reading practice tool is its use of patented technology that listens as each word is read aloud and delivers immediate support whenever a learner struggles with or mispronounces a word — reinforcing newly learned reading skills, vocabulary, and fluency.

What Reading Assistant Does

Provides Guided Reading Support to More Students

Reading Assistant uses patented speech recognition technology to deliver real-time corrective guided reading feedback, enabling learners to self-correct as they are reading aloud.

Improves Both Silent Reading and Oral Reading Skills

Unlike other digital reading practice resources that only allow learners to record themselves reading aloud, Reading Assistant actually listens and helps learners whenever they struggle or mispronounce a word — it’s like having a personal guided reading tutor available 24/7!

Reading Assistant Saves Teachers Time

Automatic calculation of words correct per minute (WCPM), and actionable comprehension and vocabulary reports make it easy for teachers to track learners’ reading levels, and specific areas of strength and weakness.

Pre-teaches Academic Vocabulary

Built-in Word Wall activities pre-teach academic vocabulary, activate prior knowledge, and provide pronunciations for new words before learners begin each e-book passage.

Reading Assistant Reaches the Reluctant Reader

Reading Assistant provides reading selections for a variety of interests and reading levels, plus frequent comprehension checks, to keep learners motivated and focused on reading for meaning as well as building reading fluency.

 

Click here to get free demo access

Reading Assistant Word Wall

 

Reading Assistant – Word Wall

 

 

Over 300 Reading Pieces in Your Library

 

 

Easy-to-Use Reports and Indicators

 

Reading Assistant provides implementation and performance reporting at the district, group, and student level to support and improve data-driven decision making. Graphical depictions show usage, performance, reading level trends, and student proficiency levels.

2018 Dyslexia – A Multi-Deficit Approach

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Click here to view the full Webinar

A Multi-Deficit approach to Dyslexia is now considered the most accurate way to understand causation.

So, the view now of Dyslexia

isn’t that it’s caused by one thing, it’s not caused by reversing letters, Visually. It isn’t caused by just one thing, but it actually has several different factors that can contribute to it.

  • One is Genetics, we will talk about that. But we know that children who come from families where there is a brother or a sister or a mother or a father or even an aunt or uncle that had reading problems are much more genetically inclined toward having reading problems themselves and some genes have been identified.
  • Secondly, we know there are Brain Level Differences. We know that children with dyslexia process information differently in the brain. When we look at brain function on functional imaging process information differently than children who don’t have reading issues. We will talk about that.
  • There are these Perceptual Cognitive Level issues and those are speech sounds perception also includes visual perception also includes memory skills, working memory, auditory phonological memory skills and skills like processing speed and we will talk about that, those cognitive level differences.
  • Then there are Environmental Factors. If children come from home where there are not a lot of language exposure, they have a more limited language experience when they enter school, that can contribute as well.

Introduction to our Dyslexia Webinar:

Discover the latest research on the processing weaknesses and early indicators in dyslexia.
Most importantly, find out how to use this information to help learners with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

This webinar is a mix of research and practical information that you can use in the classroom. You will Learn:

– The latest research on the processing weaknesses contributing to dyslexia.
– The identification of early indicators of dyslexia.
– How to use this information to help students with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

“A Revolutionary Computer Programme…”

 By  (Edit) Edit with Visual Composer

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One family, three children. The education psychologist was astonished by the positive results. As their father says“They’ve more of an interest in reading. Their comprehension is probably where they have most

Dyslexia, Home Programs, Fast ForWord, Reading Assistantexcelled.They no longer need learning support in school.” This article in The Independent shows what is possible.


Get Your Free Report on Dyslexia

In this report you will learn:

  • The Four Information Processing Skills Students Need to Learn Efficiently.
  • Why Good Language is Essential for Reading Well.
  • Why Phonics Matter AND What Other Essential Skills are Needed
  • Four Proven Neuroscience Principles to develop a “Reading Brain”
  • The latest research from universities such as Harvard and Stanford Universities on Poor Reading and Dyslexia.

Hard work commitment and a revolutionary computer programme helped the four Dunne children cope with dyslexia, writes Emma Nolan

It’s hard to believe that Albert Einstein and Leonardo DaVinci could have anything in common with Tom Cruise. Or even with Richard Branson, but they do. It’s the same thing they all have in common with the Dunne family from Kildare — they all have some form of dyslexia.

It’s estimated that dyslexia affects between six and eight per cent of the population, making it quite common. It is defined as a specific learning difficulty which makes it hard for some people to learn, write and spell correctly, despite their intelligence, motivation and education. John and Mary Dunne’s four children, Denis, 12, Kieran, 11, Brian, 9, and Maria, 7,were each assessed with a specific learning difficulty, making school and home life very difficult for all the family.

But a revolutionary computer programme has turned all their lives around. Because of their dyslexia, it was recommended that each Dunne child get 20 minutes’ reading support in school with a learning-support teacher, so they would not fall behind. “The kids read things differently; sometimes the words on the paper are jumbled up. Their brain doesn’t pick up the smaller words, like “the’ “a” and “and’ whereas they can pick up bigger words. Their reading would have been quite slow too and their comprehension wasn’t good at all. They could read a paragraph but then, because they read it at such a slow pace, you could ask them a question about it and they wouldn’t be able to answer it,” says Mary.   Knowing that the 20 minutes’ support a day wasn’t going to give her children all the assistance they required, Mary looked to the Internet for inspiration, and found a ground- breaking American programme for children with learning disabilities called Fast ForWord.

The programme — which involves a combination of at-home work with special software, plus assessment— helps improve short- and long-term memory, which is essential for word recognition. It improves students’ concentration and attention, allowing them to focus on a task. It also strengthens processing skills and improves sequencing.

See Case Study here

The Birth of Neuroplasticity Interventions: A Twenty Year Perspective

Abstract

Fast ForWord® was the first, computer/Internet delivered, neuroplasticity-based training program ever developed to enhance neural performance. It grew out of over 25 years of basic and clinical research in two distinct scientific disciplines.


One utilized behavioral, electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods to study individual differences in language development and the etiology of developmental language-based learning disabilities (including Specific Language Impairment, Autism and Dyslexia).

The other utilized neurophysiological and behavioral methods in animals to study neuroplasticity, that is, changes at the cellular level driven by behavioral training techniques.

This chapter reviews (1) how these two lines of research were integrated to form the scientific basis of Fast ForWord® and (2) the steps taken to translate and instantiate our collaborative laboratory research into clinical and classroom interventionsthat could be scaled up for broad distribution around the world, while remaining efficient, effective and enduring. In 1996, Scientific Learning Corporation (SLC) was co-founded by four research scientists (Paula Tallal, Michael Merzenich, William Jenkins and Steve Miller).

To date, nearly three million children in 55 countries have received Fast ForWord® interventions. On any given school day approximately 100,000 children log in to train on one of twelve Fast ForWord®Language, Literacy or Reading programs. More recently, Fast ForWord® language and reading programs are being used increasingly as an effective method for improving English as a second language (ESL), including success for ESL children whose first language is non-alphabetic.

Introduction

When we began our collaboration in 1993, the now rapidly growing fields of “cognitive neurotherapeutics” and “neuroeducation” did not exist, nor did the concept of using neuroplasticity-based training to improve “brain fitness”. The methods we developed, and subsequently were the basis of over 50 patents, were the first to use video gaming technologies with the explicit goal of improving human performance.

Research on Language Development and Disorders

The most basic unit of any language is the phoneme, the smallest unit of sound that can change the meaning of a word. For alphabetic languages, in order to learn how to read and become a proficient reader the child must become aware that words can be segmented into smaller units of sound (phonemes) and it is these sounds that the letters represent. This is referred to as phonological awareness. Phonemes are the basic building blocks for spoken language, as well as for alphabetic written languages.

Research on Neuroplasticity-Based Training

Neurophysiologists have mapped the features of the sensory world at the single cell level. This research has shown that within each sensory modality the features that represent the physical world come to be mapped at the cellular level in a highly organized fashion.

The Birth of Fast ForWord®: Translating Theory into Practice

Considering the amount of speech directed to the infant, it is easy to understand how important speech is in shaping the auditory cortex during critical periods of human development.

Designing Neuroplasticity-Based Training Games

For our first study we designed and developed a series of verbal training exercises ranging from speech discrimination to grammatical comprehension, disguised as “games”. Some of these games were implemented on computers, while trained professionals using tape-recorded stimuli presented others.

The First Laboratory Studies: Rutgers Summer Camps 1994–1995

Our initial laboratory studies were conducted with children who each met the criteria for language learning impairment (LLI). Two groups matched on age, IQ and language skills were quasi-randomly assigned to receive the same language intervention program.

Scaling Up: The “Neurotherapeutic Revolution”

  • Fast ForWord® Language v1
  • First Multi-site Clinical Field Trial (1996–1997)
It is one thing to obtain results in well-controlled studies in a research laboratory under the direct supervision of skilled research scientists. It is quite another to demonstrate that efficacy can be achieve in “real-world” clinics and classrooms where children most commonly receive intervention. Soon after founding Scientific Learning Corporation (SLC) our first goal was to convert the games used in our laboratory studies into a fully computerized training program (Fast ForWord® Language v1), and then to conduct large-scale field trials in clinical and educational settings to assess its “real-world” efficacy.

Independent Agency Evaluations of Fast ForWord®

Studies on the effectiveness of educational and/or clinical interventions are inherently difficult, in part because of the many skill sets and multidisciplinary collaborations required to conduct these studies in “real- world” clinics and school settings. Before introducing a new method, curriculum or product, schools have to answer a practical question: does the new approach leads to better outcomes for their students than whatever intervention strategies they currently have in place? In translating research from the laboratory to classrooms, we have found that most school administrators and curriculum directors are only willing to make important decisions for their school after they have conducted their own, internal, independent study.

Cognitive Neurotherapeutics: The Challenges of Translation

The biggest challenge we have faced along our journey to translate our laboratory research into real world settings has been negotiating the torturous path between the world of our scientific colleagues, as compared to the very different world of K-12 educators and clinicians who make the decisions about whether our products will be offered to the children who could benefit from them. Nowhere have these different worlds collided more directly than when it comes to assessing and reporting the efficacy of Fast ForWord® products.

To Learn more about The Birth of Neuroplasticity Interventions. Download the PDF Article (there is a publishers charge)  Click here

Evidence of Effectiveness – Deep Diving into MySciLEARN Reports


Deep Diving into MyScilearn Reports
Is about deep data and how we are applying Smart Technology to our products for you to understand your students’ progress better.
It is a practical session directed at educators who use Fast ForWord programs and a good overview for those of you who want to see the power of data analysis in teaching.

You should learn:

(1) The Key Indicators to monitor for student success.

(2) The identification of each student’s individual needs.

(3) How to save valuable time by automating the preparation and communication of reports!

What if you could reach every struggling reader at your school with exactly the skills they need at just the right time? What if these students started to improve quickly, were self-motivated, and worked more independently?
Learn how the new version of the evidence-based Fast ForWord reading intervention program will bring a dramatic difference to your students this year, and provide you with one option to meet the needs of multiple student subgroups.

Overview

Title: Training Webinar – Deep Diving into MySciLEARN Reports!

Originally broadcast Date:  Thursday, September 27, 2018

Duration: 1 hour

Speaker Bio

Tom Chapin

Professional Development Manager

Scientific Learning

Fast ForWord language and reading intervention allows educators, parents, and clinical providers to easily track a learner’s progress. MySciLEARN reports and Reading Progress Indicator assessments ensure every learner receives the appropriate guidance and support necessary to become a better reader and better student.

 

MySciLEARN Reports

 

MySciLEARN reports are online data analysis and reporting tools tha

[spacer t track individual learner, classroom, school, and district level performance.

  • Automatically analyzes individual and group learning progress, including diagnostic and prescriptive information, displayed in graphs and tables
  • Offers timely and specific intervention guidance, providing recommendations to maximize the impact of classroom reading instruction and the effectiveness of the Fast ForWord reading intervention program
  • Provides future forecasting with insights into the potential effects Fast ForWord can have on a school district’s performance in as little as 1 year.

Evidence Based Education

Fast ForWord language and reading intervention allows educators, parents, and clinical providers to easily track a learner’s progress. MySciLEARN reports and Reading Progress Indicator assessments ensure every learner receives the appropriate guidance and support necessary to become a better reader and better student.

 

Reading Progress Indicator (RPI)is an online assessment that rapidly measures the effects of the Fast ForWord family of products by evaluating reading performance as students progress from product to product.

RPI Combines with MyScilearn to Provide Valuable Information for Teachers on Each Student

Reading Progress Indicator (RPI) assessments correlate to international recognised normed assessments and help indicate how learners are responding to Fast ForWord.

Quickly assesses four key skill areas: phonemic awareness, decoding, vocabulary, and comprehension.

Automatically scores assessment and report results for parents, teachers, and administrators.

Provides accurate progress information that correlates to nationally recognised normed assessments.

Automatically generates assessment reports for individuals, groups and schools.

Reading Progress Indicator (RPI) was developed by Scientific Learning and Bookette Software Company (now Pearson plc).

Established psychometric procedures were used to produce a test that is valid, reliable, and unbiased, and to generate nationally-representative norms.

See the results of 23 validation studies
Click here

Reading Progress Indicator provides four assessment levels based on the grade entered for the student:

K-1,
K 2-3,
K 4-6, and
K 7-13+

(Pre-Kindergarten students are not eligible for the assessments).
The assessments are not timed.

 

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Testimonial By Amalia “My first speech”

Hi there friends.

My name is Amalia and I am happy to invite you to join me in an adventure where we shall learn how to create our first speech, build our vocabulary skills connected to these topic writing correctly and efficiently. How you can manage your interview through your use of body language but most importantly having fun.

See you there!

 

Amalia works on programs like Fast ForWord Reading 3

How it works

The Fast ForWord Reading Level 3 product consists of six exercises that correlate to reading curriculum standards.

Scrap Cat

Canine Crew

Twisted Pictures

Chicken Dog

Book Monkeys

Hog Hat Zone

These exercises build on the Fast ForWord Reading series products by concentrating on reading knowledge and fluency, with a focus on phonology and spelling, morphological properties and complexity, syntactic complexity, vocabulary, and comprehension. In addition, the exercises help develop brain processing efficiency by strengthening four key areas—memory, attention, processing rate, and sequencing. For example, the exercises:

  • Build memory by developing the ability to hold words and sentences in working memory while retrieving knowledge about vocabulary, spelling, and grammar from long-term memory.
  • Improve attention by requiring selective focus on different aspects of words and sentences, and by requiring sustained focus on long sentences and paragraphs.
  • Develop processing skills for linguistic, visual, and auditory information.
  • Develop sequencing by strengthening the ability to use positional cues to identify missing letters and words, the ability to use word order to understand precise sentence meaning, and the ability to track temporal and causal event sequences in passages.

More about the exercises

Introduction language. Each exercise begins with an introduction that explains how to work on that exercise. You can choose to present the introductions in Spanish. To learn more see Fast ForWord exercise intro languages.

Success Viewer. At the end of each student session, the Success Viewer provides the student with a quick view of his or her success in the exercises, along with any points earned in the exercises. See Reading Level 3 Success Viewer for details.

iPad. When using the exercises on a mobile digital device such as iPad, students interact with the exercises in a different way than on a computer; for example, students use a touchscreen on iPad, but use a mouse or keyboard on a computer. For details on these and a few other differences, see What’s different for Fast ForWord on iPad.

With Exercises like

 

About Twisted Pictures

The Fast ForWord Reading Level 3 exercise Twisted Pictures helps develop sentence comprehension, syntax (sentence structure), logical reasoning, and vocabulary.

The object of Twisted Pictures is to help the museum set up a new exhibit by matching the correct descriptive sentences to their corresponding paintings.

How students use Twisted Pictures

To work on Twisted Pictures, the student clicks the yellow paw to see a painting and four sentences displayed on the screen. The student must review the painting, read the descriptive sentences, and then click the sentence that best describes what is happening in the painting. Points are awarded for each correct answer, and bonus points are awarded after 10 correct answers.

Tip: The following keyboard shortcut is available in Twisted Pictures:

  • Paw (start button). Space bar
  • Responses, top to bottom. Number keys 1 through 4

How Twisted Pictures rewards progress

Session consecutive correct counter. The three lights below the student’s name represent the consecutive correct counter. The lights turn on to indicate the number of consecutive correct responses. When the student answers three consecutive trials correctly, a fun animation plays and counter resets. Each time the student answers three consecutive trials correctly two times, the safe on right side of the screen opens a little more. As the student continues answering trials correctly in a session, more fun animations play, which can help indicate a more successful session performance.

Session high score. Each time the student surpasses the highest score ever achieved in one session, the points counter lights up and flashes the words High Score.

Time. The timer at the top of the screen shows the amount of time the student needs to work on the exercise that day, which is based on the student’s protocol. When the time requirement is met, the exercise session automatically ends, and the student can either choose another exercise to work on or review his/her success in the exercises.

Exercise percent complete markers. The percent complete markers (squares) to the left of the paw indicate the percentage of completed content in the exercise. Each marker represents 10% of the exercise. When all of the markers light up, the exercise is complete.

How students master Twisted Pictures

The student will continue to work on Twisted Pictures until the skills in the exercise are mastered. Then, the exercise is closed. For more information see About completing a program.

Tip: For a complete list of content used in the exercise, check the teacher manual (see User guides & manuals).