2018 Dyslexia – A Multi-Deficit Approach

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A Multi-Deficit approach to Dyslexia is now considered the most accurate way to understand causation.

So, the view now of Dyslexia

isn’t that it’s caused by one thing, it’s not caused by reversing letters, Visually. It isn’t caused by just one thing, but it actually has several different factors that can contribute to it.

  • One is Genetics, we will talk about that. But we know that children who come from families where there is a brother or a sister or a mother or a father or even an aunt or uncle that had reading problems are much more genetically inclined toward having reading problems themselves and some genes have been identified.
  • Secondly, we know there are Brain Level Differences. We know that children with dyslexia process information differently in the brain. When we look at brain function on functional imaging process information differently than children who don’t have reading issues. We will talk about that.
  • There are these Perceptual Cognitive Level issues and those are speech sounds perception also includes visual perception also includes memory skills, working memory, auditory phonological memory skills and skills like processing speed and we will talk about that, those cognitive level differences.
  • Then there are Environmental Factors. If children come from home where there are not a lot of language exposure, they have a more limited language experience when they enter school, that can contribute as well.

Introduction to our Dyslexia Webinar:

Discover the latest research on the processing weaknesses and early indicators in dyslexia.
Most importantly, find out how to use this information to help learners with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

This webinar is a mix of research and practical information that you can use in the classroom. You will Learn:

– The latest research on the processing weaknesses contributing to dyslexia.
– The identification of early indicators of dyslexia.
– How to use this information to help students with dyslexia reach their highest potential.

“A Revolutionary Computer Programme…”

 By  (Edit) Edit with Visual Composer

dyslexia-fast forword-neuron learning

One family, three children. The education psychologist was astonished by the positive results. As their father says“They’ve more of an interest in reading. Their comprehension is probably where they have most

Dyslexia, Home Programs, Fast ForWord, Reading Assistantexcelled.They no longer need learning support in school.” This article in The Independent shows what is possible.


Get Your Free Report on Dyslexia

In this report you will learn:

  • The Four Information Processing Skills Students Need to Learn Efficiently.
  • Why Good Language is Essential for Reading Well.
  • Why Phonics Matter AND What Other Essential Skills are Needed
  • Four Proven Neuroscience Principles to develop a “Reading Brain”
  • The latest research from universities such as Harvard and Stanford Universities on Poor Reading and Dyslexia.

Hard work commitment and a revolutionary computer programme helped the four Dunne children cope with dyslexia, writes Emma Nolan

It’s hard to believe that Albert Einstein and Leonardo DaVinci could have anything in common with Tom Cruise. Or even with Richard Branson, but they do. It’s the same thing they all have in common with the Dunne family from Kildare — they all have some form of dyslexia.

It’s estimated that dyslexia affects between six and eight per cent of the population, making it quite common. It is defined as a specific learning difficulty which makes it hard for some people to learn, write and spell correctly, despite their intelligence, motivation and education. John and Mary Dunne’s four children, Denis, 12, Kieran, 11, Brian, 9, and Maria, 7,were each assessed with a specific learning difficulty, making school and home life very difficult for all the family.

But a revolutionary computer programme has turned all their lives around. Because of their dyslexia, it was recommended that each Dunne child get 20 minutes’ reading support in school with a learning-support teacher, so they would not fall behind. “The kids read things differently; sometimes the words on the paper are jumbled up. Their brain doesn’t pick up the smaller words, like “the’ “a” and “and’ whereas they can pick up bigger words. Their reading would have been quite slow too and their comprehension wasn’t good at all. They could read a paragraph but then, because they read it at such a slow pace, you could ask them a question about it and they wouldn’t be able to answer it,” says Mary.   Knowing that the 20 minutes’ support a day wasn’t going to give her children all the assistance they required, Mary looked to the Internet for inspiration, and found a ground- breaking American programme for children with learning disabilities called Fast ForWord.

The programme — which involves a combination of at-home work with special software, plus assessment— helps improve short- and long-term memory, which is essential for word recognition. It improves students’ concentration and attention, allowing them to focus on a task. It also strengthens processing skills and improves sequencing.

See Case Study here